SEYMCHAN
Pallasite / Iron IIE

 

Find: 1967, Russia, Seymchan, Magadan district. This meteorite was not observed to fall.
Coordinates: 62 54' N 152 26' E
Class: Iron, coarse octahedrite, or IIE (NHM ) or Iron-ung ( met base) Group: IIE, bandwidth 2.0 mm (officially) or Pallasite
TKW: 322,3 kg in 1967 and more than 50 kg in 2004
Chemical class: Group IIE, 9.15% Ni, 24.6 ppm Ga, 68.3 ppm Ge, 0.55 ppm Ir.
Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 43, Moscow (1968) reprinted Met. 5, 85-109 (1970)

THE SAMPLES OF SEYMCHAN HEREUNDER ARE FOR YOUR EYES . . .

THEY ARE ALL SOLD ! ! ! !

 
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VERY LARGE SLICE Seymchan 765 g SOLD
A big and very rare slice of the Seymchan meteorite with
both pallasitic and metalic ( ataxitic ) texture
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Seymchan 170.0 g SOLD
dimension 125*70* 9 mm
Wonderfull huge slice with some translucent Olivine cristals and nice repartition of olivine and nickel-iron.
 
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Seymchan 107.89 g SOLD
dimension 65*42* 27 mm
Rare end-cut with a wide cross section displaying big olivine cristals and a beautiful external surface with regmaglypts and also olivine cristals appearing.
 
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Seymchan 93.3g SOLD
dimension 105*57* 4 mm
Very large and thin slice with a part very rich in olivine cristals including some translucent ones and another part much richer in nickel-iron.
 
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Seymchan 82.6g SOLD
dimension 105*55* 4 mm
Very large and thin slice with a part very rich in olivine cristals including some translucent ones and another part much richer in nickel-iron.
 
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Seymchan 42.3g SOLD
dimension 50*51* 4 mm
Very nice slice with a very rich in olivine cristals including some large translucent ones.
 
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Seymchan 34.8g SOLD
dimension 52*51* 3 mm
WONDERFUL THIN SLICE! with a very rich in olivine cristals including some large translucent green ones. This slice is fantastic and a unique chance to get a typical Pallasite at a reasonable price in your collection.
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Seymchan 32.0g SOLD
dimension 68*25* 7 to 5 mm
Nice slice very rich in olivine cristals.
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Seymchan 31.71 g SOLD
dimension 48*49* 3.5 mm
Wonderfull slice with translucent Olivine cristals and various size of cristals, from submillimeter to centimetric.
 
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Seymchan 31.2g SOLD
dimension 78*35* 3 mm
Nice slice quite balanced in olivine cristals and nickel-iron.
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Seymchan 29.8g SOLD
dimension 75*35* 3 mm
Nice thin slice very rich in olivine cristals.
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Seymchan 28.8gSOLD
dimension 55*46* 4 mm
Beautiful wide slice very rich in olivine cristals.
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Seymchan 28.7g SOLD
dimension 50*40* 5 mm
Beautiful wide slice very rich in olivine cristals including translucent ones.
 
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Seymchan 23.7g SOLD
dimension 40*32* 7 to 2 mm
Beautiful 'roof shaped' slice very rich in olivine cristals including some translucent ones.
 
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Seymchan 20.9g SOLD
dimension 40*32* 4 mm
Nice slice quite balanced in nickel-iron and olivine cristals, including some translucent ones.
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Seymchan 5.3gSOLD
dimension 42*13* 3 mm
Beautiful little slice very rich in olivine cristals.

Circumstances of the discovery:
The larger specimen, 272.3 kg, has been found by the geologist F. A. Mednikov during a geological survey in June 1967. The meteorite hardly seen was lying among the stones of the brook-bed flowing into the river of Hekandue, a left tributary of the river of Jasachnaja of the Magadan district, USSR..
The smaller specimen, 51 kg,was found at a distance of 20 m from the first one by I. H. Markov with a mine detector in October 1967. The main mass was turned to the Academy of Sciences of the USSR.
Source: Report of geologist F. A. Mednikov (Magadan, USSR) in a letter, VIII 15, 1967 and of V. 1. Zvetkov (Moscow, USSR) in a letter X 17, 1967.
Additionnal masses: Aprox 50 kg were discovered by a party led by D. Kalachin in 2004.

Story:
Falling in prehistoric times, this meteorite was first reported in 1967. The original Seymchan 300 kilogram meteorite was found by a geological survey party in the bed of a brook flowing into the Hekandue, a tributary of Jusachnaja River in Magadan District, Russia. A smaller 51 kilogram mass was later found with use of a metal detector about 20 meters from the location of the main mass. Metal detectors are currently being used to find additional fragments of this meteorite. As reported by Mednikov (1967), Zvetkov (1967), and Tsvetkov (1969), a large mass was found in a stream bed of the Yasachnaya River (flowing into the river of Hekandue, a left tributary of the river of Jasachnaja) by a geologist, F. A. Mednikov, about 150 km from Seymchan, in the Magadan Region of the USSR (V. Buchwald, 1975). The thumbprinted, triangular-shaped mass weighed 272.3 kg. In October of that year, a further search of the area by I. H. Markov, utilizing a mine detector, resulted in the recovery of an additional mass weighing 51 kg. The large mass was provided to the Academy of Sciences, USSR. A small section of the iron was analyzed by J. Wasson (1974) and it was determined to be a member of chemical group IIE. Subsequently, a more precise elemental analysis of the IIE iron group members by J. Wasson and J. Wang (1986) found that Seymchan (and another IIE member, Lonaconing) had many elemental trends which deviated strongly from typical IIE group members, and therefore, Seymchan (and Lonaconing) was reclassified as an ungrouped iron. During a 2004 expedition to the original Seymchan discovery site, D. Kachalin found additional masses having a combined weight of ~50 kg. Remarkably, many of the new masses contain silicates with a pallasitic texture, something not discovered previously during studies of only small sections of the original mass. This compositional mixture - portions composed of only FeNi-metal, along with portions containing silicates forming a pallasitic texture - is similar to the iron-pallasite mixture found previously in both the Brenham and Glorieta Mountain pallasites.
Source: Ivan Koutyrev